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12 Kitchen Backsplash Ideas to Fit Any Budget

These 12 backsplash ideas showcase a variety of materials while covering a range of budgets.

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The Double-Take Backsplash

A mirrored backsplash looks like you can see through the wall. It’s a classy treatment that’s not too over-the-top. Mirrors reflect lots of light, so your countertop workspace is doubly bright.

Pro: Resists scratches and repels stains; reflects light; style-on-a-budget value
Con: Constant vigilance to keep clean; susceptible to heat; brittle material in a high-traffic area
Cost: Mirror is $8-$15 or more per sq. ft. installed, depending on complexity of the job


Credit: Brooks & Falatico, architects / Terry Pommett Photography

Image: Brooks & Falatico, architects
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  • If you’re looking for a money-saving DIY project, install laminated thermoplastic panels. Cut these molded-plastic materials with scissors and mount them with caulk or double-sided tape. There are lots of styles and colors; this one mimics oiled bronze.

    Pro: Moisture- and stain-proof; easy to install; good DIY project; lots of textures and colors; easy to clean
    Con: Susceptible to heat; improperly applied adhesive may cause panels to loosen
    Cost: Kit with 18 sq. ft. of backsplash, trim, outlet covers, & tape is $150


    Credit: ©2012 ACP

  • A top choice for appliances and sinks, stainless steel extends its repertoire with eye-catching countertops and backsplashes. This gleaming backsplash is brushed stainless on a plywood backing. Making a stainless steel backsplash is an art, and fabrication is a large part of the cost. Cleaning it is also an art!

    Pro: Heat- and moisture-resistant; great-looking; spills wipe up easily
    Con: Fingerprints can be tricky to clean; expensive; modern look isn’t for everybody
    Cost: $100-$250 per square foot, installed


    Credit: Croma Design Inc.

  • A favorite material since ancient times, marble makes elegant backsplashes and countertops. It’s susceptible to staining, so once a year protect it with a quality stone sealer — $20 for 1 oz. treats 50 sq. ft.

    Pro: Timeless good looks; readily available; durable; non-toxic
    Con: Can be pricey; not a DIY job; stains easily if poorly maintained
    Cost: $20-$200 per sq. ft. for a custom marble backsplash including installation; save money with marble tiles at $10-$20 per sq. ft.


    Credit: Benjamin Dhong Interior Design / Jose Picayo, photographer

  • Made from metal and porcelain, this vintage marquee display from the 1950s makes a cool backsplash — it’s durable, moisture-resistant, and easy to clean. You’ll find salvage building materials at your local ReStore, salvage yards, and on Craigslist.

    Pro: Adds one-of-a-kind personality to your kitchen; easy to clean; salvage-hunting may yield a bargain
    Con: Finding backsplash-worthy salvage takes time; quirky look not for everybody
    Cost: $200 and up


    Credit: Room designed by Stimmel Consulting Group, Inc.

  • Painted a contrasting color and splashed with under-cabinet lighting, an inexpensive beadboard backsplash is the center of attention. Pre-finished beadboard comes as plywood or fiberboard panels. Plastic (PVC) planks are good near sinks. Seal seams and joints with quality waterproof caulk.

    Pro: Inexpensive; easy to install; PVC is moisture-proof
    Con: Not as durable as hard-surface; may warp or blister if exposed to high heat
    Cost: $15-$30 per 4-by-8-ft. sheet; PVC panels are about $2 per sq. ft.

    Credit: Divine Kitchens, LLC

  • Ceramic tile comes in limitless styles, colors, and shapes, and a tile backsplash pairs with any countertop surface. A moderately skilled DIYer can tackle a tile project.

    Pro: Stands up to moisture, heat, and grease; easy-to-clean; widely available
    Con: Custom tiles can be pricey; cleaning grout gets old
    Cost: $1 to $250 per square foot; installation adds $5-$10 per sq. ft.; custom tiles start around $30 per sq. ft.


    Credit: The Rookwood Pottery Co.

  • A mirrored backsplash looks like you can see through the wall. It’s a classy treatment that’s not too over-the-top. Mirrors reflect lots of light, so your countertop workspace is doubly bright.

    Pro: Resists scratches and repels stains; reflects light; style-on-a-budget value
    Con: Constant vigilance to keep clean; susceptible to heat; brittle material in a high-traffic area
    Cost: Mirror is $8-$15 or more per sq. ft. installed, depending on complexity of the job


    Credit: Brooks & Falatico, architects / Terry Pommett Photography

  • Want a blast of easy-care color for your kitchen? Back-painted glass comes in thousands of custom colors. The color layer coats the back of ¼-inch tempered glass, giving each hue incredible depth and luster. Fabricators use large sheets of glass that minimize seams, and a qualified local glazier completes installation in 2-3 hours.

    Pro: Fantastic colors; tempered glass is easy to clean, resists heat and scratches
    Con: Can be expensive; brittle material in high-traffic area
    Cost: $20-$80 per sq. ft. installed


    Credit: GlassKote USA, LLC

  • Backsplashes made with tumbled marble, limestone, and travertine tiles have an Old World look. With their tiny pits and crevices, tumbled stone tiles should be resealed once a year with a quality, low-sheen stone sealer ($20 for 1 oz. treats 50 square feet). Some companies offer tumbled tiles treated with filler for an un-pitted surface.

    Pro: Durable; timeless good looks; heat-resistant
    Con: Needs periodic maintenance; lots of grout lines to keep clean
    Cost: $6 to $75 per sq. ft.


    Credit: Divine Kitchens, LLC

  • Granite backsplashes often are paired with granite countertops for a seamless look. The appeal of granite is universal, and it blends with any kitchen decor. Pre-finished granite backsplash pieces reduce the need for yearly upkeep.

    Pro: Durable; impervious to moisture; naturally beautiful; local varieties hold costs down (no added shipping); pairs with countertops to create seamless look
    Con: Needs periodic maintenance; exotic granites are expensive
    Cost: 61-by-4-inch pre-finished granite backsplash is $80


    Credit: Divine Kitchens, LLC

  • Sure, your backsplash has a practical side. But that doesn’t mean it has to look like a kitchen workhorse. Hand-painted murals and designs start with plain white ceramic tiles. Once the painting is complete, the tiles must be glazed and fired in a kiln.

    Pro: Adds unique art to the kitchen; durable finish resists stains and heat
    Con: Pricey; unusual artwork may affect resale
    Cost: $200-$300 per sq. ft., including tile; installation adds $5-$10 per sq. ft.


    Credit: David H. Mitchell & Associates, interior design / Rebecca Cross, artist

  • Subway tile has been around for more than a century. For a timeless, classic look, you can’t go wrong with it. And the price is right, too — it runs $2 to $8 per sq. ft. Plus, subway tile meshes with any style from modern to traditional. Tip: Use gray or tan grout. It will mask dirt.

    Like the idea of a timeless, classic kitchen? Here’s how to remodel your kitchen so it won’t go out of style.


    Credit: Jordan Mogck

  • If you like these, you may want to take a spin through HouseLogic’s library of slideshows.

    Related:

    How to Design a Classic, Timeless Kitchen

    Using Color to Personalize Your Kitchen and Home

    White: The Savvy and Chic Kitchen Color Choice

    Classic and Timeless: The White Kitchen

    The Best Choices for Kitchen Flooring

  • Fabulous Faux
  • All That Glitters
  • Ageless Beauty
  • Sign of the Times
  • High Style on a Budget
  • Custom Ceramic Tile
  • The Double-Take Backsplash
  • Who Has Handsome Hues?
  • Rock-Solid Investment
  • American Classic
  • The Art of the Backsplash
  • A Classic That Never Goes Out of Style
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  • Image: ©2012 ACP
  • Image: Croma Design Inc.
  • Image: Benjamin Dhong Interior Design/Jose Picayo, photographer
  • Image: Room designed by Stimmel Consulting Group, Inc.
  • Image: Divine Kitchens, LLC
  • Image: The Rookwood Pottery Co.
  • Image: Brooks & Falatico, architects
  • Image: GlassKote USA, LLC
  • Image: Divine Kitchens, LLC
  • Image: Divine Kitchens, LLC
  • Image: David H. Mitchell & Associates, interior design/Rebecca Cross, artist
  • Image: Jordan Mogck