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9 Hobbit Homes Worthy of Middle-earth

We’re not sure if J.R.R. Tolkien inspired all 9 of these abodes, but we do believe they’re all Middle-earth worthy. From sod-covered cottages to a snazzy woodland pad, all these fanciful spaces would make a hobbit feel at home. FYI, Bilbo Baggins will return to the silver screen in, “The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey,” on Dec. 14.

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A Home Fit For a Wood Nymph

Nope, this isn’t a scene from the new Hobbit movie — it’s a family home in Wales. This low-impact woodland house incorporates nature with a round, wooden frame and straw bale walls and floors. It took less than 1,500 man-hours to build and $5,000 to construct — less than the price of two of New Zealand’s Middle-earth pure gold coins.


Credit: Simon Dale

Image: Simon Dale
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  • Nope, this isn’t a scene from the new Hobbit movie — it’s a family home in Wales. This low-impact woodland house incorporates nature with a round, wooden frame and straw bale walls and floors. It took less than 1,500 man-hours to build and $5,000 to construct — less than the price of two of New Zealand’s Middle-earth pure gold coins.


    Credit: Simon Dale

  • These eco-friendly homes in Switzerland come with lots of perks, including lakeside views, rooftop yards, and underground parking. Because the structures were built into the earth, they’re naturally insulated — heating costs are slashed and air conditioning isn’t necessary. The only bummer: You have to mow the roof by hand, which can take hours to do using a scythe (or you could get a few goats).


    Credit: Peter Vetsch

  • High Life Treehouses is a company based in the UK that specializes in building hobbit holes. Each structure can be customized for a variety of uses, such as an adult retreat, child’s playhouse, or even a magical garden shed. Exterior features include colorful entryways and living walls.


    Credit: Henry Durham High Life Treehouses Ltd

  • This Oregon home could easily be the swankiest pad in the shire. Wood siding, stone, and other natural building materials were used in the construction, helping the facade blend magically with the landscape. The main level is in the tree canopy, making it feel like an enchanted tree house.


    Credit: Robert Harvey Oshatz, Architect

  • You can order this hobbit-inspired cottage online at Wooden Wonders. It has a dome front, with a squared-off rear addition that provides owners with extra legroom. The starting price for an uninsulated, 12-foot-wide model is $5,545; call the company for a quote on an insulated version. You’ll have to add your own cottage garden, however.

     

    Credit: Wooden Wonders Hobbit Holes

  • What do you get when you mash up a hobbit hole with the Flintstones’ house? Dick Clark’s former home. This space was built next to the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation area. Originally, the national park was opposed to any real estate development that would obstruct the views. So this rocking pad was designed to look like a stone formation so it would blend with the natural environment.


    Credit: Everett Fenton Gidley

  • Earthbag domes like this one make great garden sheds, studios, chicken coops, and houses. They’re made using polypropylene rice bags or feed bags filled with soil and then stacked like masonry. The small dome shown here is for storage and costs only $300 to make. You can check out this unique building technique on Instructables.com.


    Credit: Owen Geiger / Instructables

  • If you’re planning a trip to New Zealand, you can visit the real hobbit homes spotted on the silver screen. Shown here is Hobbiton, the shire that was featured in the movie trilogy “The Lord of the Rings.” This slice of Middle-earth is located in Matamata, about 2 hours south of Auckland. Everything is so green — do hobbits practice regular lawn maintenance on their roofs?


    Credit: Jamie L. Valle

  • Here’s a tiny home that the Keebler Elves would love. If you look closely at the front door, you can spot all the offerings visitors have left behind, including marbles, jewels, coins, and feathers. Perhaps a wee wizard lives in this very small home?


    Credit: Flickr user treenquick

  • If you like these, you may want to take a spin through HouseLogic’s library of slideshows.

     

  • A Home Fit For a Wood Nymph
  • Swiss Chalets Tolkien Would Dig
  • A Backyard Hobbit Home
  • A Forest Home Fit For Frodo
  • Modular Hobbit Homes
  • A Yabba-Dabba Abode
  • A DIY Earthbag Dome
  • Welcome to Middle-Earth
  • A Hollow Tree House
  • Like our slideshows?
  • a-home-fit-for-a-wood-nymph
  • swiss-chalets-tolkien-would-dig
  • a-backyard-hobbit-home
  • a-forest-home-fit-for-frodo
  • modular-hobbit-homes
  • a-yabba-dabba-abode
  • a-diy-earthbag-dome
  • welcome-to-middle-earth
  • a-hollow-tree-house
  • more-slideshows
  • Image: Simon Dale
  • Image: Peter Vetsch
  • Image: Henry Durham High Life Treehouses Ltd
  • Image: Robert Harvey Oshatz, Architect
  • Image:
  • Image: Everett Fenton Gidley
  • Image: Owen Geiger/Instructables
  • Image: Jamie L. Valle
  • Image: Flickr user treenquick